Consumer Alert: The dangers of generic lamps

Consumer Beware of Knock off LampsWould you compromise your health and risk your eyesight for the sake of a few dollars? Using knock-off projector or rear-projector TV (RPTV) lamps puts you at risk for potential damage to your eyesight as well as exposure to Krypton-85, a radioactive gas that is linked to cancer.

Toxic bargain

What is Krypton-85 doing in your generic projector and RPTV lamps? Using this toxic element is the only way for copy-cat manufacturers to re-produce the technology created by PHILIPS, the original manufacturer of DLP projector and RPTV lamps.

After years of research, PHILIPS developed a revolutionary arc tube filled with mercury-argon mixture that created intense light but lowered the heat allowing both the lamp and projector to become smaller.

Since PHILIPS patented technology is not available to counterfeit manufacturers, they resort to using Krypton-85 for the same result. This radioactive gas is created from by nuclear reactors during the fission between uranium and plutonium and has a number of industrial and medical applications. It’s safe when used in a controlled environment.

Lack of durability

Unfortunately, Krypton-85 is not being used under safe conditions when it comes to generic lamps, often referred to as “compatible lamps.” In order to create the knock-off lamp, counterfeit manufacturers usually replace the arc tube or refit old projector lamps with counterfeit parts; others replace the complete module. Whichever method they choose, they are still producing a lamp with a shorter life cycle and inferior technology.

Durability of generic lamps

Lack of accountability

Exposure to Krypton-85 happens when these lamps break or explode inside the projector from overheating. Short-term effects of Krypton-85 exposure are dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and loss of consciousness. Long-term effects are more serious. According to the Department of Energy (DOE) exposure to Krypton-85 can increase the likelihood of cancer.

Protect your eyesight

Comparing Luminosity of authentic to generic

PHILIPS lamps also use a UV coated reflectors allowing for a brighter and more vibrant picture. Generic lamps have a non-coated reflector, which eventually damages color wheel and optical block in your projector—both expensive components to repair.

More importantly, PHILIPS UV reflectors are designed to reduce harmful rays from the intense light thereby protecting your eyesight. Generic lamps without UV coated reflectors can produce an effect similar to looking at the sun without UV protection.

 

Buyer beware

Knock-off, countefeit, generic lamps have poor workmanshipInferior knock-off lamps are flooding the market. You’ll find generic lamps being sold at Amazon.com, Buy.com, Sears.com and eBay.com—in fact it can be hard to distinguish the real lamps from the knock-off lamps.

Please remember that “you get what you pay for” when you are online shopping around for the lowest price. Copy-cat manufacturers can be clever at disguising their knock-off products including using original PHILIPS logos and parts numbers. So even if the lamp looks authentic if the price is too good to be true, then chances are it’s a counterfeit.

Shop smart and stay safe

Be a smart consumer and purchase your lamp from a guaranteed seller such as Discount-Merchant.com. These OEM retailers have a partnership with PHILIPS to sell their original lamps. You’ll be getting a lamp produced with the proper materials and a guarantee replacement should there be any problems. Those few extra dollars are worth peace of mind and your health.

Learn more

To read more about counterfeits, please visit http://www.fixyourdlp.com/counterfeits.

Posted in Counterfeit Lamp Awareness, FixYourDLP, Guides and Manuals, Philips, Philips Lamps Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,

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